Project aims to remove millions of tons of CO2, support thousands of farmers

Amazon announced today the launch of the Agroforestry and Restoration Accelerator, a carbon removal project in Brazil’s Amazon rainforest, focused on reforestation and regenerative agroforestry, in partnership with global environmental organization The Nature Conservancy.

According to Amazon, the investment will support 3,000 farmers through the creation of a more sustainable source of income, and result in the removal of up to 10 million metric tons of carbon dioxide from the atmosphere through 2050 through the restoration of natural rainforests.

Kara Hurst, Vice President of Worldwide Sustainability at Amazon, said:

“Restoring the world’s forests is one of the most meaningful actions we can take right now to address climate change, and it will require innovative solutions to be successful. We are proud to launch the Agroforestry and Restoration Accelerator in partnership with The Nature Conservancy to support solutions that prioritize high environmental integrity and strong community benefits.”

Under the new partnership, The Nature Conservancy will work together with the World Agroforestry Centre and several local civil society organizations to implement the accelerator by helping small farmers restore degraded cattle pastures to native forest and agroforestry, providing farmers with a sustainable source of income through the sale of cocoa and other crop. The accelerator will also explore digital and satellite-based technologies, and new methodologies to support farmers, nurture markets for sustainable forest-based commodities, and to quantify and monitor carbon removal.

Jennifer Morris, CEO, The Nature Conservancy, said:

“For 20 years, The Nature Conservancy has worked with small farmers, community leaders, government officials, and Indigenous peoples to identify and implement win-win solutions, like agroforestry, that help people and nature thrive. This new partnership with Amazon will allow us to provide the resources and technical assistance needed to advance this program and demonstrate that regenerative agroforestry and carbon markets are viable business models for communities in the Amazon.”